Tagged: MySQL

Linux Cloud Server Hosting with ASPHostPortal.com :: How To Create a New User and Grant Permissions in MySQL

About MySQL

MySQL is an open source database management software that helps users store, organize, and later retrieve data. It has a variety of options to grant specific users nuanced permissions within the tables and databases—this tutorial will give a short overview of a few of the many options.

How to Create a New User

However, in the cases where more restrictions may be required, there are ways to create users with custom permissions.

Let’s start by making a new user within the MySQL shell:

CREATE USER 'newuser'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';
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Ubuntu 12.04 Hosting :: How To Install and Secure phpMyAdmin on Ubuntu 12.04

About phpMyAdmin

phpMyAdmin is an free web software to work with MySQL on the web—it provides a convenient visual front end to the MySQL capabilities.

Setup

The steps in this tutorial require the user to have root privileges on your virtual private server. You can see how to set that up here in steps 3 and 4.

Before working with phpMyAdmin you need to have LAMP installed on your server. If you don’t have the Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP stack on your server, you can find the tutorial for setting it up here.

Once you have the user and required software, you can start installing phpMyAdmin on your server!
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Linux Cloud Server Hosting-ASPHostPortal.com:: How To Install MediaWiki on Centos 6.4

MediaWiki is a free open source wiki program that allows users to create their own personal wiki sites. Originally built for Wikpedia, it is now used by thousands of other projects due to its scalability and high customization.Install MediaWiki on your server.

At the time of writing, the latest version of MediaWiki is MediaWiki 1.21.2. To check for the latest version of the platform, visit their website and simply alter the code to match the most updated version (if desirable).
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Linux Cloud Server 2014 Hosting – ASPHostPortal.com :: Installing and Using the Vim Text Editor on a Cloud Server

Introduction

One of the most powerful text editors accessible from the command line is the vim editor. Built on the foundation of “vi”, an editor dating back to 1976, vim adds additional functionality and power, while maintaining the editing style of its predecessor.

Installation

Due to vim’s wide-spread use on the Linux command line, it is available in almost every distribution’s default repositories.

On Ubuntu and Debian, use apt-get to install:

sudo apt-get install vim

On Fedora and CentOS, install with yum:

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Linux Cloud Server Hosting with ASPHostPortal.com :: How To Import and Export Databases and Reset a Root Password in MySQL

How to Import and Export Databases

Export

To Export a database, open up terminal, making sure that you are not logged into MySQL and type,

mysqldump -u [username] -p [database name] > [database name].sql

The database that you selected in the command will now be exported to your panel.

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Linux Cloud Hosting with ASPHostPortal.com :: How To Install Rails, Apache, and MySQL on Ubuntu with Passenger

Intro


Installing Ruby on Rails and MySQL on an apache virtual private server is the first step toward getting Ruby applications live and online. Three useful installers make the task of building this server easier than ever before.

Setup

This tutorial requires you to have a  server up and running. Additionally, the rails ready script needs to be performed by a user with sudo privileges. If you don’t have a user like that on your server, you can check out how to do that in steps 3 and 4 of this tutorial.

Step One—Install Rails Ready


Once you are logged in on your virtual server with your user with root privileges, type in the command to install Rails Ready:

wget --no-check-certificate https://raw.github.com/joshfng/railsready/master/railsready.sh && bash railsready.sh

Rails Ready can be installed either from the source or with RVM, the Ruby Version Manager. I would recommend using RVM—it’s an easy installation and will later let you to switch between multiple versions of Ruby if needed.

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Cloud Linux Hosting :: How To Install Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP (LAMP) stack On CentOS 6

3

LAMP stack is a group of open source software used to get web servers up and running. The acronym stands for Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. Since the server is already running CentOS, the linux part is taken care of. Here is how to install the rest.

Set Up

The steps in this tutorial require the user on the virtual private server to have root privileges. You can see how to set that up in the Initial Server Setup Tutorial in steps 3 and 4.

Step One—Install Apache


Apache is a free open source software which runs over 50% of the world’s web servers.

To install apache, open terminal and type in this command:

sudo yum install httpd

Once it installs, you can start apache running on your VPS:

sudo service httpd start

That’s it. To check if Apache is installed, direct your browser to your server’s IP address (eg. http://12.34.56.789). The page should display the words “It works!” like this.

How to find your Server’s IP address


You can run the following command to reveal your server’s IP address.

ifconfig eth0 | grep inet | awk '{ print $2 }'

 

Step Two—Install MySQL


MySQL is a powerful database management system used for organizing and retrieving data on a virtual server

To install MySQL, open terminal and type in these commands:

sudo yum install mysql-server
sudo service mysqld start

During the installation, MySQL will ask you for your permission twice. After you say Yes to both, MySQL will install.

Once it is done installing, you can set a root MySQL password:

sudo /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation

The prompt will ask you for your current root password.

Since you just installed MySQL, you most likely won’t have one, so leave it blank by pressing enter.

Enter current password for root (enter for none): 
OK, successfully used password, moving on...

Then the prompt will ask you if you want to set a root password. Go ahead and choose Y and follow the instructions.

CentOS automates the process of setting up MySQL, asking you a series of yes or no questions.

It’s easiest just to say Yes to all the options. At the end, MySQL will reload and implement the new changes.

By default, a MySQL installation has an anonymous user, allowing anyone
to log into MySQL without having to have a user account created for
them.  This is intended only for testing, and to make the installation
go a bit smoother.  You should remove them before moving into a
production environment.

Remove anonymous users? [Y/n] y                                            
 ... Success!

Normally, root should only be allowed to connect from 'localhost'.  This
ensures that someone cannot guess at the root password from the network.

Disallow root login remotely? [Y/n] y
... Success!

By default, MySQL comes with a database named 'test' that anyone can
access.  This is also intended only for testing, and should be removed
before moving into a production environment.

Remove test database and access to it? [Y/n] y
 - Dropping test database...
 ... Success!
 - Removing privileges on test database...
 ... Success!

Reloading the privilege tables will ensure that all changes made so far
will take effect immediately.

Reload privilege tables now? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

Cleaning up...

All done!  If you've completed all of the above steps, your MySQL
installation should now be secure.

Thanks for using MySQL!

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